MADRID, 1960 Fabio Hurtado

The pictorial universe of Fabio Hurtado is located in the United States of America of the twenties and thirties of the last century, with scenes and characters that refer us to the canvases of Edward Hopper and Tamara de Lempicka as well as the films The Great Gatsby and Bonnie & Clyde.

It paints a time that hardly any of us has known, but it does not matter, since he knows how to capture a historical spirit that, to this day, is not only valid, but even necessarily defensible.

THE PAST THAT LOOKS AT THE FUTURE OF FABIO HURTADO

by Josep M. Cadena

The pictorial universe of Fabio Hurtado is located in the United States of America in the 1920s and 1930s, with scenes and characters that refer us to both the canvases of Edward Hopper and Tamara de Lempicka and the films The Great Gatsby and Bonnie & Clyde. The women wear cloche hats and short bob cut hair, they dress with modernity and elegance and exhibit independence. The presence of means of transport -Coche, train, airplane, transatlantic- supports the assertion of the futurist Marinetti that a racing car can be more beautiful than the Victory of Samothrace. The animals provide the virtues and characteristics that are their own, so the dog expresses fidelity and the peacock symbolizes glamor. If we pay attention to playing the pictures we will clearly hear jazz, the music that reigned in the Cotton Club.

Fabio Hurtado paints a time that hardly any of us has known, but he gives, since he knows how to capture a historical spirit that, to this day, is not only valid, but even necessarily vindicable. The twenties came after the cataclysm of World War I, and the thirties suffered the depression that arose from the financial crack of 1929. The reaction to the planetary war was the awakening of a desire to live, the understanding that the life is a fragile gift that has to be missed. At the same time, the economic shock that began with the collapse of the stock market generated the adoption of the New Deal, a new political pact that understood the need to control big capital, reduce social differences and move towards a system of protection for the most destitute.

We are also emerging from a crisis. That is why the paintings of Fabio Hurtado, and the values ​​they convey, despite being set in the past, are fully current. The women who paint have confidence in themselves, they are not afraid of the trip, and although they appreciate the company, they know how to go through the world all by themselves. They are seen in continuous movement, since the adventure of knowledge and progress has no final stop. Women have traditionally been oppressed, and it is they who can best embody the society towards which we should aim. The community in which we have to want to live should be like the woman who paints the Spanish father and Italian mother: safe, kind, elegant, sensitive, restless and worried about improving.

I find it very fitting that the Rusiñol Gallery of Sant Cugat directed by Ignacio Cabanas and Victoria Ballbé celebrates its 30th anniversary with this exhibition by Fabio Hurtado, since both the gallery owners and the painter share a respect for the lessons of the past that should serve to live a present of what we can be proud of and aspire to an even better future. So be it.

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